Cultivating A Community- The Garden at Bocara

Camelot Homes |

Daron

Daron Joffe of Farmer D Organics

In a world rife with disunity; where political divisiveness and separation between cultures, classes and religious ideologies pose a risk that division will become our society’s new normal, the world can begin to feel like a very lonely place. These facts, coupled with today’s unprecedented use of technology can leave people starving for a need to connect with other human beings on a very basic level.

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There is some evidence of even further breakdown in communication within the family dynamic. Catch-up time at the family dinner table is often impaired by the never-ending interaction between people and their mobile devices and the bad news is, it’s not just the kids. The days of running next door to borrow a cup of sugar seem to be more likely found on old tv re-runs than in the neighborhoods of today. We’ve all seen the neighbor (or have been the neighbor) who drives into their garage and closes the door behind them without so much as a friendly wave. Many of us no longer even do our own yard work, so bonding over Saturday morning hedge-trimming is also a thing of the past.

At Camelot Homes we believe that there is a sincere yearning among today’s homeowner to connect with their neighbors. A desire for a sense of community that will bring people back together. That is why we have teamed up with Farmer D Organics to build a community garden in our new neighborhood at Bocara in Scottsdale, Az. It is our belief that a community garden can enhance the quality of life in a very tangible way. When we connect around the growing of food, it not only changes the way we look at what we’re eating but creates opportunities for all sorts of other activities. From cooking and canning, to flower arranging and potlucks, it opens up an entirely new world in which people can connect with one another.

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The Hampton Garden– image via houzz

When asked why community gardens have become so popular, Farmer D replies, “After an economic downturn, people become much more concerned with and connected to where their food comes from.” Citing the Victory Gardens of post World War I and World War II, Farmer D goes on to explain, “They were not only designed to reduce the pressure on the public food supply brought on by the war effort, but were also considered a civil morale booster.” — in that the gardeners could feel empowered by their contribution of labor and rewarded by the produce grown. This made victory gardens become a part of daily life on the home front.

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The Victory Garden at The Smithsonian Institute

“Another primary driver,”says Farmer D “is that the community garden is a wonderful venue for people to gather and enjoy the social aspect of actually growing food: sharing stories, sharing harvests, sharing meals. I’ve seen communities really come together across socioeconomic lines. It brings people together who would not normally hang out, and fosters an appreciation for where the food comes from.”

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Farmer D and Friends

With that being said, it seemed a natural fit for Camelot Homes and Farmer D Organics. It has all happened very naturally and we’re looking forward to a bountiful future bringing people together across cultural and generational lines, to nourish body, mind and soul.

“It really boils down to this: that all life is interrelated. We are all caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one destiny, affects all indirectly.”

― Martin Luther King Jr.

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